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Offline Bill10

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2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« on: September 18, 2015, 03:39:51 AM »
Forum References:

Tech Tip: How to Remove Fairings on 2015 V1K
by gharshman

Finally done it, Got both headlights working at the same time!!
by Adventure Boy


______________________________________

Edit:
IMPORTANT:
Before proceeding with the mod please see the following post as ultimately it was not successful:

https://www.versys1000.com/index.php/topic,15383.msg178850.html#msg178850


______________________________________

The 2015 Versys 1000 LT has dual headlights in its uniquely styled nose that utilize two, single-filament 55 Watt H7 Halogen Bulbs. The bike also provides for switching between low and high beam via a left bar switch. However, there’s no real high and low beam in the true sense of the words. Rather, switched to low beam, only the right 55 Watt single-filament bulb is lit as shown in the photo below. Switched to high beam, both the right and left 55 Watt single-filament bulb are lit.

In researching the H7 bulb, I found applications for the 55 Watt version of the bulb for use as either a high-beam bulb or a low beam bulb. I suppose that whether it’s a high beam or low beam on the Versys is up to oncoming traffic. I’ve never had any flash their lights. But irrespective, as a touring motorcycle, I think that a properly functioning set of lighting would be in order for the Versys 1000.



A full-time dual headlight modification was previously accomplished by member Adventure Boy. See the references and links above. That modification provided for two dual-filament (a low beam filament and a high beam filament) H4 Halogen bulbs. It resulted in (i) the lighting of only both right and left low beams with the bar switch on “low” and (ii) the lighting of all four filaments with the bar switch on “high.”

The modification that I have completed also uses the H4 dual-filament bulb, but with a different wiring harness design and a relay in the circuit to result in (i) the lighting of only both right and left low beams with the bar switch on “low” and (ii) the lighting of only both right and left high beams with the bar switch on “high.”

Low Beam:


High Beam:


High Beam Dash Light:


BULBS AND WIRING:

I used Basic Sylvania H4-9003 Halogen Bulbs. They each draw 60 Watts/4.7 Amps in high beam (120/9.4 total) and 55 Watts/4.3 Amps in low beam (110/8.6 total). The factory H7 bulbs were 55 Watt bulbs (110 Watts/ 8.6 Amps total). The entire headlight circuit is on a 15 Amp fuse. It wouldn’t appear that the mod is going to tax the electrical system.



Here’s a picture of all the wiring and electrical bits. I needed three colors of wire and used Blue, Red and Black. There are four bullet connectors shown. What I really needed was two, 2-Pin connectors as, ultimately, you need a way to be able to disconnect the bulbs/wiring up in the nose of the bike from the frame. 2-Pin connectors would have been better, but I couldn’t find any today so I went with the bullets.



I was also able to make use of a pair of universal H4 Sockets by removing the boots.




The factory headlight circuit is uncomplicated (Factory Service Manual Section 16-61). The smaller 5 Watt City Lights are not on the same circuit as the headlights. The factory headlight circuit consists of a headlight relay that is triggered upon engine start-up to power the circuit. From there, a single lead powers (i) the right headlight bulb full time and (ii) the Hi/Lo Beam switch. The Hi/Lo Beam Switch is simply an on-off switch with two pins. Power is fed to the switch in one pin and the circuit to the left headlight is closed (comes on) when the Switch armature is flipped to High. The switch in Low Beam is a dead end. The factory circuit looks like this with the H7 bulb and actual wire coloring. (NOTE: may not be the same coloring in other countries!)



The modified circuit is shown in the diagram below. First note that each of the H4 bulbs have three pins on the bottom (high+/low+/ground). The H7 bulb only had two pins on its bottom (on+/ground).

The modified circuit using the H4 bulbs to establish proper operation of the headlights introduces a 5-Pin Relay that will open and close the circuits to each of the low beam lights and the high beam lights. It can only open one circuit at a time, so it can either light the low beams or the high beams, not both. Fortunately, this is where the rudimentary Hi/Lo Switch actually becomes useful. As reflected in the diagram, the Switch is now rigged to trigger the new relay. Until triggered, the armature is at rest, closing one of the circuits (Pin 87a); naturally that circuit is connected to the low beams. When the Switch armature is flipped to Hi Beam, the coil draws the armature away from 87a (opening that circuit and shutting off low beams) and closing the other circuit (Pin 87); naturally that circuit is connected to the high beams. It works!



Now that we got that down, if you’re going to do this mod, it’s time to go read gharshman’s “Tech Tip: How to Remove Fairings on 2015 V1K” because you’re going to need to remove all of the front fairings including the nose cone with the headlight lens reflectors.



Once you get all those fairings off, you’ll need to find the headlight connectors as shown below:



Below is a photo showing the factory wiring to the H7 bulbs in the back of the lens reflector. I removed and stored those wires and connectors away in case I need to reinstall the H7 harness. I only used the wiring harness up to the connectors attached to the frame as shown in the prior pic.



There are only 4 wires in the motorcycle's headlight wiring harness and only three are needed to accomplish this modification, then there are a couple that need to be added. As for the four in the factory harness the two wires in the right connector are RED/YELLOW and BLACK/YELLOW. The two wires in the left connector are RED/BLACK and BLACK. Scroll back to the factory diagram above to see what these wires are doing. (NOTE AGAIN: May not be the wiring colors in other countries!!)

Here's what you need to do to the factory wiring to mod the headlights:

-RED/YELLOW is connected to Pin 30 (Power Source+) in the 5-Pin Relay.
-BLACK/YELLOW is not used.
-RED/BLACK is connected to Pin 86 (Trigger Source +) in the 5-Pin Relay.
-BLACK is split to be connected to the ground pins on both H4 bulbs.

I added the following wiring:

BLUE is the low beam wire that originates at Pin 87a in the 5 Pin Relay and is split to both bulbs.
RED is the high beam wire that originates at Pin 87 in the 5 Pin Relay and is split to both bulbs.
Black is used to ground the relay at Pin 85 to my Accessory Plug Ground Wire that is connected to the negative terminal on the battery.

Here's another way to look at it (except, as noted above I combined the two H4 bulb grounds into one). Factory H7 on the left and moded H4 on the right.



Wiring the bulbs involved replacing the H7 sockets (which I’ve set aside) with the H4 sockets shown in an earlier photo and then running the wires back to the Relay and grounding sources.









It was extremely difficult to find a good location for the relay and I’m not sure that it wound up in a good location. Lots of fork movement and limited space from the fairing and lens reflector didn’t make for a lot of choices. This location is directly under and a little back from my left accessory outlet. You can see the bottom of the accessory outlet in the background. I grounded the relay (Pin 85) to the negative lead on the accessory outlet that travels back to the negative terminal on the battery.



Below are splices on the right headlight connector (first photo) and splices on the left headlight connector (second photo). On the right, the RED/BLACK wire is connected with Red to Pin 86 of the Relay. BLACK/YELLOW is not used. On the left, the RED/YELLOW is connected with Red to Pin 30 of the Relay. BLACK is connected to the Black wires coming from the ground pins on the two H4 bulbs in the nose cone.





That’s pretty much the wiring for this modification.

BULB MODIFICATION:

One of more difficult aspects of this mod was modifying the H4 bulb to fit into the aperture of the lens reflector. At issue is getting the 43mm base of the H4 down to 34mm to fit in the aperture. Adventure Boy, in his thread “Finally done it, Got both headlights working at the same time!!” used tin snips. I used a combination of dremel cutting wheel, dremel grinder and large grinder. I don’t think there’s an easy way to do it.





You really need to get that base flat or the bulb is going to shine off in some weird direction once installed in the aperture.







Obviously the bulb requires a lot of careful cleaning after all it’s gone through.



It should be noted that the locking hook barely fit around the base of the larger H4 and the tab needed to be slightly pinched together with a pair of pliers before I could get it to hold down.



ALIGNMENT AND AIMING:

While the lights seem to be pretty well aligned shining on the wall of my garage, I need to do the aiming drill to double check. The aiming procedure is in Section 2-62 of the Service Manual. I’ll report on that later.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2015, 07:39:40 PM by Admin »

Offline gharshman

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2015, 04:12:54 AM »
Man, you make it seem easy!  You have me flip-floppin' and again thinking about doing this.  :188:

How long did it take you to cut and trim each H4 base into the proper size and shape?

Nice work!
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"Pie and coffee are as important as gasoline." - Me

Offline 100milesaway

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2015, 08:31:43 AM »
Bill.  What a fantastic post :152: You are obviously a very talented man.  Your explanations and illustrations of the task are also spot on, well done. I'm sure that this article will be of great help to anyone wanting to do the conversion.   Your my hero :020: :152:
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Online silverfox

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2015, 09:30:03 AM »
You are obviously a very talented man.  Your explanations and illustrations of the task are also spot on


 :028:      :028:       :028:

Silverfox         :020:        :020:

Offline GoodCleanFun

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2015, 11:06:36 AM »
A very useful mod, and an excellent report!

Very Well Done!

 :028:   :031:
- Joe

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Vents to atmosphere,
drains to the bilge and helps maintain a neutral pH.”

Offline Bill10

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2015, 02:33:28 PM »
*Originally Posted by gharshman [+]
Man, you make it seem easy!  You have me flip-floppin' and again thinking about doing this.  :188:

How long did it take you to cut and trim each H4 base into the proper size and shape?

Nice work!

Thank you! And thanks to the others for their comments.

I wanted to do this mod and found myself with an empty calendar this week. I was planning a trip to the Keys, but cancelled because of the weather. Hope I can make the trip next week with my new lighting.

_________________________________

On cutting and trimming “each” bulb there are actually two answers because the second bulb took half the time of the first. I was hyper careful cutting and trimming the first bulb and it took 20 minutes. Having got it down, the second bulb took 10 minutes (maybe less) and I was still pretty careful.

The cutting mod on the bulb is one of those projects where I believe the success is dependent on the tools you pick to do it. That base isn’t a soft metal like aluminum; I think its steel. Whatever tools are picked can’t impart too much stress on the glass/filaments part of the bulbs or else it’s going to break or blow.

In my case, the first step of cutting the 43mm outer base off the bulb with my dremel was done in short order because I had a good cutting wheel. It was a Diamond Rotary Cutting Disc from a set of 5 I got at Harbor Freight for $7.00. Amid the pile of sh#t that most HF tools are, these discs stand out as pleasantly useful. I do not believe that I would have had any success with that hard metal with a grit-metal or other type of cutting wheel, or it would have at least taken way longer.

http://www.harborfreight.com/diamond-rotary-cutting-discs-5-pc-69657.html



With the outer base off, you’re at 38 mm needing to hone in to 34 mm.



Getting the inner base from 38mm to 34 mm was where it took longer on the first bulb than the second bulb, because I tried to get it so exact using a caliper. Rather, than use the caliper on the second I just eyeballed it. It was clear that using the caliper wasn’t getting it any more accurate than just carefully grinding a little at a time (using a grinding wheel on my drill and a small grinding wheel on my dremel) and continually holding it to the aperture to see where the next grind needed be. What’s important is getting the final base against the aperture flat, trimming the bulb to be secure in the aperture (the hook lock will help this) and oriented the bulb so the low beam pin is closely centered on top. Anything else is addressed in the lighting alignment step.

Oh btw, I got a useful $3.00 caliper at Harbor Freight too.  :002:

http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-utility-caliper-7914.html


One last thing that I think is important to note is that it’s a struggle to lock the H4 bulb into the aperture with the hook (as it’s called in the Service Manual) because the base of the bulb that the pins stick out of is much wider than the H7s. I touched on this in the OP; to make it fit the little handle on the hook needs to be slightly pinched together. The photo below shows the hook on the H7 before the mod. The last photo in the original post above shows the hook handle as pinched and locking down the H4.



Offline dancingweasel

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2015, 05:06:00 PM »
What an EXCELLENT piece of work! Thanks for sharing this, and for the very clear guide. :-)

Offline Bill10

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2015, 09:28:23 PM »
*Originally Posted by dancingweasel [+]
What an EXCELLENT piece of work! Thanks for sharing this, and for the very clear guide. :-)

Thank you, Sir!  :002:

Offline augie05

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2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2015, 02:13:38 PM »
One word... wow!

My last motorcycle, vastly inferior overall, had much better headlights with both bulbs always on. The Vstrom 650.

Why would Kawasaki provide a headlight solution that appears to compromise security when riding during the day???     

Inferior from an esthetics standpoint as well.

Offline Bill10

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Re: 2015 Versys 1000 LT Headlight Modification
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2015, 02:33:02 PM »
AWE! SNAP.  :003:

Well, I appreciate all the accolades, but unfortunately I need to report that the headlight modification took a turn for the worst yesterday during night testing by my son and I.

The high beam is properly centered, but the radius of its light dispersion pattern is so big that the brightness is diluted and literally dimmed making it difficult to see. In addition, the high beam light pattern projected several wanky light strips on the road vertically forward for several meters (like something was interfering with the lenses). The low beam is dispersed tightly. So much so, that while standing on the pegs my shadow from overhead street lights projected on the road in front of the bike to either the left or right (depending on which side the street light was located). In addition, the widely dispersed high beam and the tightly dispersed low beam results in the low beam projecting farther than the high beam and appearing brighter than the high beam starting at about 10 meters. Standing right in front of the bike, it’s clear that high beam is brighter, but get out past 10 meters the low beam is clearly brighter. Lastly, whether on low beam or high beam, both sides of the headlights throw off a halo-like glare around the lenses that is extremely annoying to oncoming traffic.

Everything in the new circuit is working fine. The aim is established. As best I can tell, the problem has to do with the bulb type and the unusual contour of the reflector (the back of the lens compartment). They’re not working right together.

Bottom line, I can’t say that I felt the lighting was safe.

I need to roll back to the factory configuration this weekend to prepare for a couple back to back trips. The next break, I’ll see if I can make the H13 bulb that we talked about in the other headlight thread work.

 



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