Author Topic: Reliability  (Read 2855 times)

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Offline TYKE

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Re: Reliability
Reply #10 on: December 27, 2019, 01:31:02 PM
Throttled you are correct , the amazing Versys 1000 is indeed a very reliable and enjoyable bike to own

Oh.. nice to see you posting  :028:   
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Offline flatfour

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Re: Reliability
Reply #11 on: December 27, 2019, 03:06:20 PM
I've probably had rather different experiences in terms of reliability than some of the others who have posted.

In terms of faults with the "modern" touring bikes, in order of fewest problems first I list mine below:

1) BMW K1200 RS - no faults, 16,000 miles with me, 29,000 in total.
2) Ducati ST2 - 17,000 miles (all mine) clutch slave cylinder leaked and was replaced under warranty.
3) Kawasaki Versys 1000 - 13,500 miles (all mine) new front discs under warranty due to "grabbing" when coming to a stop, minor clutch judder when pulling away.
4) Kawasaki 1400 GTR - 12,500 miles (all mine) gear selection problems at 700 miles, new front discs fitted (judder), new screen fitted (cracks around mounting points), new drive shaft assembly complete (bearings spinning in housing), new battery. All repaired under Kawasaki warranty, except for the battery that failed at 18 months (warranty on this is only 12 months).

I have not included my BMW K1300 GT, as it has only covered 4,750 miles with me. To date however, the handlebar switches have been replaced (BMW 2- - year warranty) otherwise all seems to be well.

Offline TYKE

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Re: Reliability
Reply #12 on: December 27, 2019, 03:24:26 PM
*Originally Posted by flatfour [+]
I've probably had rather different experiences in terms of reliability than some of the others who have posted.

In terms of faults with the "modern" touring bikes, in order of fewest problems first I list mine below:

1) BMW K1200 RS - no faults, 16,000 miles with me, 29,000 in total.
2) Ducati ST2 - 17,000 miles (all mine) clutch slave cylinder leaked and was replaced under warranty.
3) Kawasaki Versys 1000 - 13,500 miles (all mine) new front discs under warranty due to "grabbing" when coming to a stop, minor clutch judder when pulling away.
4) Kawasaki 1400 GTR - 12,500 miles (all mine) gear selection problems at 700 miles, new front discs fitted (judder), new screen fitted (cracks around mounting points), new drive shaft assembly complete (bearings spinning in housing), new battery. All repaired under Kawasaki warranty, except for the battery that failed at 18 months (warranty on this is only 12 months).

I have not included my BMW K1300 GT, as it has only covered 4,750 miles with me. To date however, the handlebar switches have been replaced (BMW 2- - year warranty) otherwise all seems to be well.

I have heard/experienced some of those faults   GTR 1400 ... never had any issues with any of the 4 I owned covering about 38,000 miles
Never owned a Duc
Never had any problems with either of the 3 Versys 1000 I have owned covering around 20,000 miles
BMW K 1300 GT EE dreadful gearbox selection and dangerously faulty switch gear (kill switch )

OOI Colin, did BMW replace all switches ?
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Offline flatfour

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Re: Reliability
Reply #13 on: December 27, 2019, 04:40:48 PM
Rog, yes both switches were changed under the two - year used bike warranty on the K1300GT.

I was happy with all of the bikes listed, none left me feeling that I would not want to buy the same again. I do think though that reliability is quite a mixed bag with any mass - produced vehicle (car or motorcycle). There are huge variations in fit and finish, as I discovered when I worked for the vehicle manufacturer/importer.

I still have very close connections with Japan, spending quite a lot of time there and, when I was based there, as I could speak the language reasonably well, was often seconded to our partner's headquarters to assist in smoothing over production problems with our own vehicles. From those days, I would say that the only manufacturers that enjoyed an excellent production quality record were the ones that bought in a lot of components and were able to switch suppliers at a moments notice when product defects were found . In most cases, the quality was similar to European - produced vehicles, the main difference being that the Japanese invested heavily in new tooling which enabled machining to finer tolerances, whereas we ( at least in the UK) often kept using the same old equipment when it was well past its best.

Currently, we run a VW car and the BMW bike, as well as the older Japanese classics, of course. In general, I have found that the German products perform as well as their Japanese equivalents. Again, it just comes down to luck and where you buy in the life cycle of the product. First in when a design is new is rarely a good idea, and run - out models can also be problematic, for all sorts of reasons.

If you want reliability, perhaps the best buy is an uncomplicated, proven design that is not nearing the end of its production run!

Offline TYKE

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Re: Reliability
Reply #14 on: December 27, 2019, 08:23:49 PM
Colin, i can totally understand your opinion and I agree.

After working for VAG (UK) for a wonderful 15 years and regularly visiting German manufacturing plants on many occasions I too have seen manufacturing plants in operation many times, ....IMHO your observations are accurate

The K1300 GT  I owned really pi**ed me off, because it was basically such a very, very good bike with an absolutely stonking engine, but mine at least 'featured' faults that simply shouldn't have been there, maybe because it was a run out model which preceded the K1600   :notsure:   
The world is full of good people, if you can't find one - be one

Make every second count, make every moment special.

Offline Miks

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Re: Reliability
Reply #15 on: February 11, 2020, 07:34:57 PM
Well...after owning over 40 motorcycles, including a few BMW's, I can say this - Kawasaki builds one tough machine for sure!  I owned several Kawasaki's over time, and had a Concours 1000 that I pinged the rev limiter from time to time, and rode it like it was a sport bike at times...the growl was intoxicating should I say!  I put a lot of miles on the bike, ran cheap motorcycle oil in it, and it never burned even a teaspoon of oil between changes.

I think you should buy a bike that you love, so if it is a Duck, BMW, Guzzi or whatever, KULE!  But, if you are looking for a maintenance free gem  that you can just go out and ride, take it coast to coast without thinking twice, the Versys 1000 is a great choice.  Got enough character to make you feel you are on a motur-psykle, yet refined enough to enjoy!

Offline Iceman63

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Re: Reliability
Reply #16 on: February 21, 2020, 04:51:01 PM
I've never owned a European bike...all of mine have been from the big four, and have been reliable.
 My old 02' FZ1 that I still have, is my current bench mark. I've had it since new, and she currently has 103,000 miles and has been utterly reliable. I do 99% of my own maintenance, never had to even replace any rotors till around 40 thou. Never had any major(ish) issues till now; I"ve got the carbs out for a thorough cleaning(thank you ethanol fuel).
  I've only got about 7000 miles on my 18' V1, and I hope she turned out to be as reliable. So far so good.

 



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