Author Topic: Can I just wire up a set of LED fog lights, or is a power relay needed  (Read 10317 times)

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Offline Old school

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Fellow riders,

I'm a do-it-yourself kind of guy with limited funds.  I didn't do the fog lights through the dealer because the cost is prohibitive.  However, I have trouble seeing where I'm going at night with the stock headlight.  Can I just wire a set of LED driving lights to the fog-light accessory connection on the bike (assuming I can find it)?  The manual says 56 watts max.  I've seen posts where it seems like a power relay is needed.  I don't know what a power relay is...  Do I need one if I stay below 56 watts total?

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.


Offline weljo2001

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Shows the stock light bar is just a plug and play. No accessory relay needed. You can see the install instructions on the stock unit here.....https://www.kawasaki.com/Accessories/Item/KLZ1000BGFAL/999940487
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Offline oldkawboy

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Since LED's consume very little wattage I did not use a relay on my 650 when I installed them & everything works great.

I added a set of the oem LED lights on my V1000 and there was no separate relay in the kit, just plug and play.

Dan

Offline Vespista1960

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*Originally Posted by Old school [+]
I'm a do-it-yourself kind of guy with limited funds.
I'm too.
When I decided to install fog lights I surfed the web and took advantage of the experiences of other guys on Italian forum.
There are three options: a) buy the OEM kit, b) do a good job, trying to save some euro but using good quality components (wiring, connectors, switch, supports, lights themselves, etc.), c) do a cheap but lousy job with poor quality components.
I discovered that the difference between option a) and b) is not great and I bought the OEM kit.
Hope this helps.
In any case, no, you don't need to learn what a power relay is (although you should :002:). The circuit is already relayed.
The dedicated connector is under the front fairing on the frame that supports the horn. You can easily access it with the help of Garshman's excellent tutorial: https://www.versys1000.com/index.php/topic,15367.0.html
If you don't buy the OEM kit you need a connector like that in picture below. I bought in on Cycleterminal.com.
Good job!

Offline Paul_Smith

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*Originally Posted by Old school [+]
Fellow riders,

I'm a do-it-yourself kind of guy with limited funds.  I didn't do the fog lights through the dealer because the cost is prohibitive.  However, I have trouble seeing where I'm going at night with the stock headlight.  Can I just wire a set of LED driving lights to the fog-light accessory connection on the bike (assuming I can find it)?  The manual says 56 watts max.  I've seen posts where it seems like a power relay is needed.  I don't know what a power relay is...  Do I need one if I stay below 56 watts total?

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.
You can, but... given that you don't yet know what a power relay is or how to use it, I suspect you would just get yourself into trouble trying to wire it up without help. There are four problems you will need to solve, regardless of whether you do it yourself or get someone else to do it for you. 1) Which lights to use, 2) how and where to mount them and 3) how to wire them and 4) how to switch them. Kawasaki solve all four problems but charge you for the privilege.

Working backwards through the problems, you can switch them with a switch on the handlebars (~$10) or link them to something existing such as the low beams (which would be my preference). To wire them, you either go with Kawasaki's existing options which a) requires you to to be under 60w which rules out most of the halogen options such as Givi S310's, and b) to use connectors matching Kawasaki's or perform surgery on the existing wiring loom. Or you wire them yourself which requires a fuse, a power relay and some cable, all of which you should be able to get for ~$10. Also you can remove them again and restore the bike to factory if this is important to you. How to mount the lights? If you are fitting engine guards then it is easy, you just clamp the lights to the bars. (Note I think the Kawasaki lights and the Givi bars are incompatible, but I have neither so can't be certain). If you don't have engine bars, then mounting them will be more of a challenge. That just leaves you with the problem of choosing which light is right for you.

A power relay is just an electrically operated switch which allows a small amount of power on one circuit to open or close a switch for  a larger amount of power on another circuit. A wire goes from the source to the relay and from the relay to the load (in this case the lights). A second wire goes from the source through one or more switches to the relay. When the switches are closed completing the circuit, the power is allowed through the relay from the source to the load. The way they are often used on bikes is to take a jumper from the side light to the relay so the thing you want to power is on or off depending on the sidelights, but the current needed to power it does not have to go through the sidelights or their switches.

Offline Vespista1960

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Accurate as usual.
In my opinion there is, among others, a good reasons to switch the fog lights instead of connecting them to low beam. If I'm not mistaken, the OEM lights are sealed and it is not possible to change the led when it burns. You have to change the light.
The duration of the led is presumably very long, but not endless. Then it is better than us guys with limited funds use them only when needed because a single spare light costs the outrageous sum of 180 euro.

Offline frenchminet

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I went for the Givi LED foglights(s320)/Givi crashbar on my first Versys, OEM LED foglights/OEM bracket on the second. In neither case do you need a relay.

If it hadn't been provided with the 2016 "GT kit", I actually preferred the first solution :1:

Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 01:20:19 PM by frenchminet
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Offline gharshman

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As long as the current rating of the switch is greater than the current draw of the lights, you don't need a relay.  Most LEDs have low current draw.
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Offline Paul_Smith

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*Originally Posted by Vespista1960 [+]
...
The duration of the led is presumably very long, but not endless. Then it is better than us guys with limited funds use them only when needed because a single spare light costs the outrageous sum of 180 euro.
You are half right but I cant agree with your logic. I just bought a pair of H7 LED bulbs for €60 (or €30 each, not €180) but since they have an expected half life in excess of 10,000 hours instead of the 500 hours of a 'quality' bright bulb like a Philips Crystal, that is 20 times longer and are less than three times as expensive, I think I will save a lot of money by having much better lights.

Offline Old school

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Does anyone know how many Watts the OEM fog lights draw?  How many Lumens of output?

Thanks to all for info!