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Offline Old school

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2017, 08:52:03 PM »
Thank you for looking into this.  I may pursue this, depending on price.  I have a sense of how fast is "safe" given the police in the area.  I would be riding for awhile, then look down and have a little panic until I remember that I need to subtract 4 or 5 mph.  There are places I go that like to give "5 over tickets", so there isn't much "wiggle room".  I've found it a little challenging to keep the bike at a constant speed, and for some reason I tend to drift upwards over time.

Offline Paeonia lactiflora

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2017, 01:11:59 AM »
I just  chanced the rear sprocket  and I'm satisfied whit the result concerning the speed deference

Offline MALACAY

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2017, 08:57:32 PM »
In the EU by laws of homologation is obligatory that the velocimeters have an "error", must show more speed of the real.

paste:
The approval standards for vehicles are practically the same in all European Union countries, with some minimum differences. As for the speedometer, the speed indicated by the car speedometer should never be less than the actual speed and should have a maximum error margin over the actual speed of 10% + 4 km / h.

For example, for a speed of 80 km / h, the maximum error limit of our car would be 12 km / h and 100 km / h would be 14 km / h. In other words, if the speedometer of our car indicates 114 km / h is that our actual speed will be between 100 and 114 km / h, but never less than 100 km / h. For this reason, among other reasons, in the case of a speeding ticket, speed margins are applied at speed

Offline Bike_nerd

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2017, 04:53:52 AM »
Interesting to hear about EU regulations regarding speedometer error.  The maximum margins seem really excessive (+14 km/h - what??).  I have no idea what the North American regulations are - I can only go by my own observations.  I have owned many motorcycles and have never seen one with an accurate speedo.  They are always 5-10% optimistic, which is consistent with MALACAY's comments so perhaps it is a regulatory thing.  It is odd though that the same does not seem to apply to cars.  I have checked numerous cars ranging from a 2002 Honda Accord to a 2013 Toyota Highlander, and in every case, the speedometers have been absolutely bang on - no error at all.  The only time I've seen any error is if the vehicle is running non-standard tire sizes which would be expected.

Is it harder to make a motorcycle speedo accurate due to the chain drive or other issues?  I don't really see why because the transmission gearing and final drive ratios are 100% predictable.  Don't know, but I am anal about such things so if my new Versys is out by the usual 5-10%, I will correct it because I like to know how fast I'm actually going.

Offline Kryton

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2017, 07:10:47 PM »
*Originally Posted by Old school [+]
Fellow riders,
I have now realized that my speedometer is fairly inaccurate.  When the speedometer reads 65 mph, two different GPS sources show the speed to be 61 mph.  The difference increases as speed increases (as one would expect).  Is there a way to correct this, other than putting larger tires on the bike?

Industry standard is 7-10% out. This is the same for cars and motorcycles. The reason is to keep you on the right side of the law. To get a correct speed, mount a GPS. Pointless exercise imho to calibrate it, but your call

Offline peter73

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #15 on: April 18, 2017, 10:21:48 PM »
*Originally Posted by Bike_nerd [+]
If the speedo is inaccurate, how can the odometer be accurate?  Would they not be driven by the same signal?

No. The Speedometer is driven from a sensor measuring the rotation speed of either the front or the rear sprocket. The Tachometer gets its reading from the crankshaft position sensor.

Online Sonny

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2017, 10:44:33 PM »
Another factor: when the speedo overstates mph/kph, then the fuel mpg indication is puffed up as well. Makes the vehicle look more fuel efficient than it really is. One of those little incremental scams...  :125:

A small consolation, based on the same false data: if the speedo exaggerates 5%, the vehicle actually has 5% fewer miles on it than the odometer indicates.  :124:
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Offline Bike_nerd

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2017, 02:33:04 AM »
*Originally Posted by peter73 [+]
No. The Speedometer is driven from a sensor measuring the rotation speed of either the front or the rear sprocket. The Tachometer gets its reading from the crankshaft position sensor.

No one said anything about the tachometer which measures engine rpm.  I said the speedometer and the odometer are likely driven by a sensor that is either measuring wheel rotation, or perhaps rotation of an internal component inside the transmission.  The point being that it doesn't seem possible for the speedo to be out, without the odometer also being out.  People seem to accept the fact that motorcycle speedometers have significant error, but cars do not.  I have checked quite a few cars now against a reference GPS and as long as the wheels and tires are stock, the error is negligable.  Just trying to understand why this is.  I don't think people would accept their car speedos being out as much as our motorcycle ones are.

Offline TYKE

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2017, 10:05:46 AM »
*Originally Posted by Kryton [+]
Industry standard is 7-10% out. This is the same for cars and motorcycles. The reason is to keep you on the right side of the law. To get a correct speed, mount a GPS. Pointless exercise imho to calibrate it, but your call


Totally agree with Kryton...surely its better knowing your speedo reads fast rather than it reading slow  :002:   
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Offline Paul_Smith

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #19 on: April 19, 2017, 11:21:57 AM »
I think there is a little confusion about the regs.
At 80km/h, the speedo is legal if it shows a speed between 80 and 92 (10%+4). At 50mph, the same speedo is legal if it shows a speed between 50 and 57 (10% +3). Any speedo showing less then the road speed is illegal which is why you can never get a ticket for doing a speed greater then indicated, and claiming your own speedo was faulty  is not a valid defense against speeding tickets.

So if it can show the correct speed, why doesn't it? Bike tyres have an additional problem which car tyres don't and that is at high speeds, the diameter of the tyre actually increases. That reduces the indicated speed, and if it goes below the actual speed, it becomes illegal, so bike speedos start higher in the legal range then their four wheel counterparts.

You never need to worry about the inaccuracy of the speedo, as it is always in your favor.
 

 



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