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Offline Justa_Poser

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2017, 02:13:04 PM »
Here in the U.S....... and maybe 20+ years ago, there were several class-action automobile lawsuits claiming speedometer and especially odometer inaccuracy.  Some of the reasoning was that if the odometer is 5% optimistic, then that's 5% less mileage for warranty coverage.  i.e. the standard warranty is 36 months or 36,000 miles....

New automobiles since then have had magically accurate speedometers/odometers.  For whatever reason.

Yamaha motorcycle company got sued for grossly inaccurate tachometers on their YZF-R6.  They were touting their new R6 had the highest revving engine EVER at 17,500.  As it turns out - the actual number was 16,000.  There was that much tachometer error.  In the end, Yamaha offered to buy back any R6 that the customer was not "satisfied" with.

I had a Honda 2005 Honda VTX1300 with a 12% optimistic speedometer - and 2% error on the odometer.
2007 Gold Wing 3% speedometer/0% odometer.

2005 HD - less than 1%/1%

Cheap technology is available to ensure speedometer/odometer accuracy.  Most error is intentional.

Next opinion, please






« Last Edit: August 14, 2017, 02:14:36 PM by Justa_Poser »
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Offline Paul_Smith

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2017, 03:36:05 PM »
*Originally Posted by Justa_Poser [+]
Here in the U.S....... and maybe 20+ years ago, there were several class-action automobile lawsuits claiming speedometer and especially odometer inaccuracy.  Some of the reasoning was that if the odometer is 5% optimistic, then that's 5% less mileage for warranty coverage.  i.e. the standard warranty is 36 months or 36,000 miles....

New automobiles since then have had magically accurate speedometers/odometers.  For whatever reason.

Yamaha motorcycle company got sued for grossly inaccurate tachometers on their YZF-R6.  They were touting their new R6 had the highest revving engine EVER at 17,500.  As it turns out - the actual number was 16,000.  There was that much tachometer error.  In the end, Yamaha offered to buy back any R6 that the customer was not "satisfied" with.

I had a Honda 2005 Honda VTX1300 with a 12% optimistic speedometer - and 2% error on the odometer.
2007 Gold Wing 3% speedometer/0% odometer.

2005 HD - less than 1%/1%

Cheap technology is available to ensure speedometer/odometer accuracy.  Most error is intentional.

Next opinion, please
I would be interested to know what this cheap technology you are talking about is, or if there is any evidence for your opinions. Short of using GPS, every speedo I have ever worked with operates on some variation of multiplying the circumference of the tyre by the number of rotations in a given period of time (odos are even simpler since they just count the rotations).  And given that the circumference changes depending on tyre brand, pressure and wear, and given that the law says it is an offense to indicate a speed lower then actual, I am curious to know how you think it could be done.

I would also love to know how you calibrated your Odo to determine the error?

Offline Justa_Poser

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #22 on: August 14, 2017, 04:37:17 PM »
*Originally Posted by Paul_Smith [+]
I would be interested to know what this cheap technology you are talking about is, or if there is any evidence for your opinions. Short of using GPS, every speedo I have ever worked with operates on some variation of multiplying the circumference of the tyre by the number of rotations in a given period of time (odos are even simpler since they just count the rotations).  And given that the circumference changes depending on tyre brand, pressure and wear, and given that the law says it is an offense to indicate a speed lower then actual, I am curious to know how you think it could be done.

I would also love to know how you calibrated your Odo to determine the error?

Yes, well - you must first understand some rather technical measurement methods
.
http://list25.com/25-humorous-and-unconventional-units-of-measurement/
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Offline Tony the oldie

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #23 on: August 14, 2017, 05:10:54 PM »
 :86:

 :89:

Kryton got it right months ago.  Time for everyone to have a nice cup of tea  :002:

Offline TYKE

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2017, 06:28:59 AM »
*Originally Posted by Tony the oldie [+]
:86:

 :89:

Kryton got it right months ago.  Time for everyone to have a nice cup of tea  :002:

 :89:  nothing is gained by exchanges which become 'challenges' between members. lets not lose sight of the O.P question    :2:    :028:   
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Offline Topbox

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2017, 08:38:02 AM »
Its funny this topic should be revived now as I was thinking about my speedo error.

The speedo error just annoys the hell out of me, I note Pauls and Tykes view on better safe than sorry. However, there are times when knowing your speedo is accurate would be helpful.

I refer to road works with 50mph limits policed by average speed cameras  :003: (lets not get into forward facing or not). The issue here is that HGV Tachos are calibrated accurate so when they come to road works they can and want to travel at exactly 50mph. So if I ride my Versys at an indicated 50mph when its really (say) 46.5mph then I could well have a 40 tonner right up my jacksie trying to bully me into going faster, not a nice feeling.

I aren't saying this is the reason I would like to make mine more accurate but it is a reason. I want to change it to cure my OCD on speedo reading. Paul, your point on tyre circumference is well made.

Special note:- when writing this opinion I accept the risk of Paul's and Tykes response  :016:

TB
 :2: :152:
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Offline TYKE

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2017, 08:44:47 AM »
*Originally Posted by Topbox [+]
Its funny this topic should be revived now as I was thinking about my speedo error.

The speedo error just annoys the hell out of me, I note Pauls and Tykes view on better safe than sorry. However, there are times when knowing your speedo is accurate would be helpful.

I refer to road works with 50mph limits policed by average speed cameras  :003: (lets not get into forward facing or not). The issue here is that HGV Tachos are calibrated accurate so when they come to road works they can and want to travel at exactly 50mph. So if I ride my Versys at an indicated 50mph when its really (say) 46.5mph then I could well have a 40 tonner right up my jacksie trying to bully me into going faster, not a nice feeling.

I aren't saying this is the reason I would like to make mine more accurate but it is a reason. I want to change it to cure my OCD on speedo reading. Paul, your point on tyre circumference is well made.

Special note:- when writing this opinion I accept the risk of Paul's and Tykes response  :016:

TB
 :2: :152:


 :008:  No risk of any response of mine being contentious (I hope )  :008:   

I agree that the speedo inaccuracy is an irritation especially in this day and age when it should/could be more accurate.

My speedo like others reads fast, I haven't thought about the percentage as I'm not that bothered, however I do rely on my Sat Nav device to give me an accurate read of my actual speed if needed
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Offline Tony the oldie

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2017, 08:49:16 AM »
Top box

I understand your worry - I suggest the way to get round that is to ride with a satnav for a few hours and check the satnav speed against the bike speedo at different speeds.  You will find that the bike speedo always reads high - somewhere between 5 and 8% - because of the EU regulation.  Once you know that happens all the time at every speed level then you can go at 53mph on your speedo safe in the knowledge that you are doing pretty close to 50mph and the trucks won't be getting too close to your jacksie.

Hope this helps in a friendly way  :002:  :031:

Tony

Offline TYKE

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #28 on: August 15, 2017, 10:13:23 AM »
*Originally Posted by Tony the oldie [+]
Top box

I understand your worry - I suggest the way to get round that is to ride with a satnav for a few hours and check the satnav speed against the bike speedo at different speeds.  You will find that the bike speedo always reads high - somewhere between 5 and 8% - because of the EU regulation.  Once you know that happens all the time at every speed level then you can go at 53mph on your speedo safe in the knowledge that you are doing pretty close to 50mph and the trucks won't be getting too close to your jacksie.

Hope this helps in a friendly way  :002:  :031:

Tony

 :89:   :86:  and another friendly smile   :2:     :008: 
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Offline Sonny

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Re: Any way to calibrate speedometer?
« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2017, 02:13:45 PM »
I never get speeding tickets, knowing I can indicate a few mph over and be close to the actual limit. I also know that a  tailgater on my ass has an optimistic speedo in his car or truck as well, and he is indicating 10 or 15 over as a matter of routine, while putting my life in danger.  :157:

Speeding with clear pavement in front of you is one thing. But tailgating, especially tailgating a MC, should carry a heavy penalty and should be enforced vigorously. It's the same as putting a gun to the head of the motorcyclist. In Texas at least, by the time I've ridden 15 or 20 minutes, someone has put me in that jeopardy and I've had to deal with it, either by speeding myself or getting out of the driver's way. And if I opt for speed to get out of danger, and then suddenly pass a traffic cop, guess who is going to get the ticket? That's right -- me, not the jerk behind me who has just ruined my ride.

Tailgating is also the cause of 80% of the fender bender rear-end collisions that continually jam our freeways down to a crawl.

What's wrong with this status quo? Well, it's that too many drivers are unthinking and stupid and dangerous, and law enforcement is AWOL at putting enough of a penalty on tailgating to get through to them. And motorcyclists take an unfair amount of the risk to life and limb, and law enforcement isn't concerned about it.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2017, 02:28:22 PM by Sonny »
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