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Offline TYKE

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #50 on: January 13, 2018, 12:23:13 PM »
*Originally Posted by kris [+]
Tyke,

The brakes feel better now, but they were good even previously (I could stop with one finger).  From what I have researched, not having full contact between pads and rotor, may still give adequate braking power, but unless the pads are worn uniformly the brake disc will eventually suffer.


 :028:   

Good luck with the new pads kris.....  I'm sure that you will be 'keeping an eye on them'   
Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain

Roger (Rog)

Offline kris

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #51 on: January 13, 2018, 01:14:37 PM »
*Originally Posted by TYKE [+]

 :028:   

Good luck with the new pads kris.....  I'm sure that you will be 'keeping an eye on them'

Thank you :)

I am wondering if perhaps the Centrifugal force of the rotor can cause the wearing of the external part of the pads, before they are fully bedded-in, more than the internal?  I might be totally wrong, but who knows...

Offline Paul_Smith

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2018, 10:26:48 AM »
*Originally Posted by kris [+]
Thank you :)

I am wondering if perhaps the Centrifugal force of the rotor can cause the wearing of the external part of the pads, before they are fully bedded-in, more than the internal?  I might be totally wrong, but who knows...
You are half right, but it is not centrifugal force. It is simply that the outer part of the disc rotates faster against the pad then the inner part so will generate more friction, heat and wear. This is quite normal. 

Offline kris

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2018, 11:13:44 AM »
*Originally Posted by Paul_Smith [+]
You are half right, but it is not centrifugal force. It is simply that the outer part of the disc rotates faster against the pad then the inner part so will generate more friction, heat and wear. This is quite normal.

Thank you.  This is good to know!

Offline Crosshairs

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #54 on: January 15, 2018, 12:13:37 PM »
*Originally Posted by Paul_Smith [+]
You are half right, but it is not centrifugal force. It is simply that the outer part of the disc rotates faster against the pad then the inner part so will generate more friction, heat and wear. This is quite normal.



Since I've never seen that actually happen, could you explain it to me? ..Im quite sure that mine rotate the same speed at both ends... :001:

Offline kris

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #55 on: January 15, 2018, 01:16:28 PM »
I googled it, and it seems to be true.  here some people tried to explain it:

"Think about it like this: to do one rotation, a point near the centre of the wheel travels a much smaller distance than a point further out. Both parts must do 1 rotation in the same amount of time because the wheel is rigid. Therefore the point further from the centre has a greater speed."

"The angular speed is the same regardless of distance from the point of rotation, since angular speed is defined as the following:

 

ω=dθdt
 

therefore, it is clear that since every point along the merrygoround covers the same angular distance (theta) then their angular speeds are equivalent.

 

However, the linear speed isn't. Looking at it from a standpoint of how much distance does it actually cover in a single rotation, you can tell that it covers more distance the farther out you go.

 

The relationship between linear and angular speed is the following:

 

Vtrans=ωr
 

where omega is the angular speed and R is the distance from the point of rotation to the point at which you want to calculate the speed of."




Offline Crosshairs

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #56 on: January 15, 2018, 01:30:08 PM »
I guess it makes sense but jeez...my head hurts just trying to understand it...:)

Offline Paul_Smith

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #57 on: January 15, 2018, 05:08:16 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crosshairs [+]
I guess it makes sense but jeez...my head hurts just trying to understand it...:)
Just compare the circumference of the inside of the disc's contact patch with the outside of the contact patch. 

Offline Crosshairs

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #58 on: January 15, 2018, 05:23:21 PM »
*Originally Posted by Paul_Smith [+]
Just compare the circumference of the inside of the disc's contact patch with the outside of the contact patch.

Yeah, it kinda makes sense , but I  cant seem to wrap my head around it....I understand the principle behind it, but at the same time, cant see how it plays out in real time....  in theory, there shroud not be any deviation in the contact patch...the whole pad should be in contact the whole time....thats the part that I cant process

I need more coffee .:)
« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 05:26:18 PM by Crosshairs »

Offline Paul_Smith

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Re: Disc Brake Quiet
« Reply #59 on: January 15, 2018, 05:30:45 PM »
*Originally Posted by Crosshairs [+]
Yeah, it kinda makes sense , but I  cant seem to wrap my head around it....I understand the principle behind it, but at the same time, cant see how it plays out in real time....  in theory, there shroud not be any deviation in the contact patch...the whole pad should be in contact the whole time....thats the part that I cant process

I need more coffee .:)
It is, but unless you are standing still, the pad is 'slipping' against the disc. It just happens to be slipping faster against the outside of the disc then the inside. 

 



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