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Offline Crosshairs

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2019, 11:35:46 AM »
*Originally Posted by Rockdoc [+]
When new you could buy a receiver to plug into the cabling powering it from the bike but it wasn't a cheap option and required an annual subscription. At the time I wasn't convinced of the need. Even now that I know it can be useful I'd struggle to justify the expense for the mileage I do now that I'm retired.

Keith

 Im confused about your post...you could buy what when what what was new?

Offline Rockdoc

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2019, 01:41:09 PM »
When I  bought my 660 there was a separate, plug-in module that picked up traffic info. It plugged into the Garmin wiring harness under the tank and needed a subscription. At the time I did not think it was worth it for the amount of long-distance riding I was doing - it did not work with the car mount so that took away most of my mileage anyway. Even if the module were still available my objections to it would be stronger because I do less long-distance work now I'm retired.

Now that I have a generous data allowance I can use Google Maps on my phone without worrying and I have largely replaced the Garmin in the car. I still use the 660 on the bike because the plastic cover on my ST610 tank bag does not work well with the touch-screen, although it should.

I hope this is clearer.

Keith
2018 Candy Fire Red/Metallic Flat Spark Black GT.
Where do they get the names for these colours?

Offline Crosshairs

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2019, 02:13:43 PM »
*Originally Posted by Rockdoc [+]
When I  bought my 660 there was a separate, plug-in module that picked up traffic info. It plugged into the Garmin wiring harness under the tank and needed a subscription. At the time I did not think it was worth it for the amount of long-distance riding I was doing - it did not work with the car mount so that took away most of my mileage anyway. Even if the module were still available my objections to it would be stronger because I do less long-distance work now I'm retired.

Now that I have a generous data allowance I can use Google Maps on my phone without worrying and I have largely replaced the Garmin in the car. I still use the 660 on the bike because the plastic cover on my ST610 tank bag does not work well with the touch-screen, although it should.

I hope this is clearer.

Keith


Ah yes, now it makes perfect sense.... :763: :031:

Offline Claude

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2019, 12:32:46 AM »
*Originally Posted by sprocket [+]
The 395LM does not have the MP3 player the 660 and 595 do and...
Not exactly.
For those interested, I chatted today with a guy at gpscity.ca and he told me the 395LM can play music 3 ways and one of it is playing music stored on a card inserted in the card slot. So, yes, the 395LM can store an play MP3. He gave me a link to the user manual which says the same thing. Then, my choice is a 395LM or a 396LM if the former is not available anymore.

Offline sprocket

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2019, 02:38:40 AM »
Thanks Claude for the info I did not know the 395 would play MP3 I will look into this GPS as an option it is less money.

Offline Stonker

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2019, 11:39:49 PM »
Without wishing to hijack the thread, If I just want Bluetooth speakers and don't need a mic, what is the best option?

Offline ncroadtoad

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Re: Communication system & GPS
« Reply #26 on: January 12, 2019, 09:40:26 PM »
One thing I've not heard mentioned is route planning software. Many people don't use it and basically just tell the GPS to "go there" and follow it. Most models have different routing options you can select, like curvy, fast, short, etc.. Used in this manner, a GPS is probably still probably a better option than a phone (not everyone's opinion for sure), but you're really only getting a fraction of the utility out of the device. Once you learn how to use Basecamp (Garmin) or MyDrive (TomTom), maybe other (?), it's a new ballgame. From the comfort of your computer, you can plan a route that will utilize any road, trail, path you want and upload it to the device. When you're ready to ride, you simply start the route and just follow the instructions. Like anything else involving technology, it's not perfect - but awful close. Believe me, I've been doing it for years, you can create routing that you would never be able to remember and use roads that will likely not appear on your average road map. Anything from a day ride to a trip as long as you want can be built on your computer and uploaded to the GPS. You really don't know - what you don't know until you look into this.

As to the GPS itself, my 2 cents is, "I don't know.."  I've been using them for 15 years, almost exclusively Garmin. No slam on TomTom, just no experience. I've used the M/C models (Street Pilots & Zumos) and for the last several years Nuvi's on my bikes. The M/C models are the least trouble as they are waterproof - about the only advantage. But they are expensive and the screens are small. The Nuvi's (there are a lot of different models) can cost half the money, have up to 7" screens, and will hold your music on an SD card. They will not send directions via Bluetooth and you need to safeguard/prepare them for rain. Additionally you might want to check that your choice has a resistive screen vice capacitive unless you have those fancy gloves.

It's been my experience that every GPS will eventually break, no longer be supported or otherwise become less useful. When my Nuvi craps out, it's less painful to dump  than when that Zumo decides to die.

Just one guys opinion, best of luck with your search. But please, do yourself a favor and check out your choice's mapping software. A whole new world will open up.
Cheers

 



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