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Offline TallyRex

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2019, 01:35:22 PM »
I let the bike warm up till the idle drops.  Maybe I'm wrong, but I think there must be a reason why all the mfgs have their FI bikes idle high when cold.

Offline Keener

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2019, 01:43:41 PM »
*Originally Posted by TallyRex [+]
I let the bike warm up till the idle drops.  Maybe I'm wrong, but I think there must be a reason why all the mfgs have their FI bikes idle high when cold.

Yeah ...that makes sense to me as well,  and they run rich on high idle just like my old Z1 does on choke ..


Offline dizzy

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2019, 03:55:11 PM »
Aren't high revs 1.) To help the engine to warm up quickly so that mixture can be leaned off asap 2.) Help assist in not stalling. The sensors ECU and FI manage that process? :notsure:

With carburetors and manual choke it is more hit and misss and fuel vapurisatio/mix only optimised with warm engines. There is no ECU/FI to manage interim step.

Pulling away once oil circulated gets the temperature up more quickly and bike runs optimally earlier?? :notsure:


Offline TYKE

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2019, 03:59:31 PM »
*Originally Posted by TallyRex [+]
I let the bike warm up till the idle drops.  Maybe I'm wrong, but I think there must be a reason why all the mfgs have their FI bikes idle high when cold.

 :89:  I recall collecting a new ZX9R (which had a manual choke) and falling off it within 20 metres of the dealership due to a combination of new tyres and high revving engine when the bike was cold.   :012:   

It taught me a lesson, so now I also let the bike warm up whilst I put on my helmet and gloves etc.,  it's become a habit I guess   :028:
Be wary of an old man in a world where men die young

Roger (Rog)

Offline tall-mike

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2019, 04:22:27 PM »
After googling the subject, what caught my eye was the statement that, while the piston heats up quickly the cylinder itself takes longer to warm up, thus to increase your rpm at this time, damage could be done in the form of "scuffing" of cylinder wall and piston. So I will continue to wait until the motor reaches 140 degrees fahrenheit and the idle recedes to 1100 rpm. But that's just me, maybe a little anal retentive.

Offline Le ptit Quebec

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Re: Idle RPM
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2019, 06:55:07 PM »
*Originally Posted by Keener [+]
As far as warming the engine , there is a lot of old school thinking on this subject and I guess from habit I am one of them …
from cold or on a cool morning , i warm the bike  for about one minute max  it seems to respond better to throttle , rather than fire up and go .
I have had motorcycles from the past and current 1974 Z1 Kawasaki .. that needed a good warm up before you could go anywhere ...those are /were carbureted machines and depending on the bike your choke needed to be on or no go .

Old habits die hard but fuel injection changes the game  :016:

On carbed engines, the issue when running cold in cold temperature (even worst when foggy) is the acceleration of air flow in carb can create frost in the intake. It can even go up to ice the jets when shutting of the trottle. With injection, it's history.

 



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