Author Topic: Old motorcycles  (Read 1787 times)

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Offline Vespista1960

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #10 on: May 29, 2020, 07:55:57 AM
Fantastic bikes guys!  :celebrate:
@ Claude, I would go with the CB400 F. One of the best bikes ever imho.

Offline TYKE

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #11 on: May 29, 2020, 08:02:33 AM
Over the years I have owned 'quite a few' Classic bikes.. there are a number of decisions that need to be made before getting involved

1,   Are you hoping to make a Classic an investment for the future... IMHO any classic won't beat your pension

2    Do I plan to do all the restoration work myself, or employ the services of an 'expert'.... beware there are 'experts' ou there who are only good at charging huge sums

3,   Do I plan to ride the bike or exhibit it at Classic shows... High Days and holidays are really the best days for riding concourse bikes

4,    Which type/model of bike appeals to me... am I fulfilling a lifelong fantasy or re-living my youth

5,    JOIN A RELATED CLUB WHERE YOU WILL GAIN ADVICE AND HELP

6,    Certain makes/models of Classics have replacement parts that are extremely difficult to find, even 'unobtainium' and/or very, very expensive

7,   Don't buy the first  one that you see, take advice from experts on forums

Here's a selection of pictures of some of my classics, Japanese and some Brit Irons



My current only 'Classic' a ZRX 1200 R

 


My 1981 'J' TZ 250 with Phil Read on board

 


A 400 framed, 500 cc engined KH with Suzuki/Ohlins front and rear suspension etc etc

 


The Holy Grail Kawasaki H2C 1975  drool drool

 


My rare Bridgestone 350 GTO... beautiful and built by Dave Crussell

 

My H1B 1972.. lovely bike to ride

 

My S3A UK bike... which was Rick Bretts rider

 


MY GT 750 Suzuki 'Kettle'  outrageous colours

 


A KZ 400 US bike which was original with only 2 miles recorded ! 

 

A couple of Trail bikes.. F7 & F6

 

 

And a Velocette Venom 500cc Brit Iron .... lovely to look at but not easy to live with IMHO

 


A BSA A10 Gold Flash , actually quite a nice easy going bike

 


And a couple of Off Road & Trials bikes

 


 


 

I think that you should get yourself a project which will provide you with hours of enjoyment, however remember that older bikes can be costly, put a hole in your wallet and will remind you that a modern bike is much more reliable...

Good luck and let us know what you decide









The world is full of good people, if you can't find one - be one

Make every second count, make every moment special.

Rog

Offline Claude

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #12 on: May 29, 2020, 12:11:36 PM
*Originally Posted by flatfour [+]
I've owned (and still own) quite a few Honda four - cylinders from the 1970's. All run on the standard points/condenser set - up, I usually replace the complete timing plate (with points/condensers fitted) for a new item from David Silver or CMSNL when I first buy the bike and, over many years (probably 20 or more) I have never needed to replace either the points or condensers again.

I have heard that there can be problems with the impedance of coils for many electronic replacement systems, as well as issues with plug caps (resistor type or otherwise) not suiting the new system, so I am inclined to leave well alone.

I've only ever replaced spokes for cosmetic reasons, never heard of loosening, either more recently or back in the 70's.

In my view, the main thing is to appraise the prospective purchase carefully, especially for originality. Not only will an incorrect to spec bike lose lots of money, in many cases components (especially engine internals such as camshaft oil feed jets and similar) are simply not compatible between models of the same bike!

Thanks for the info!
Who are "David Silver or CMSNL"? Any links please?

I intend to only buy bike(s) that is (are) in stock (or as close as possible) condition. I know parts could be sometimes hard/impossible to find. I would alos prefer bikes that have a place in history so they should be easier to sell if I decide so.

Regarding the CB400F, the seller told me it is very clean (not seen it yet) but have a clutch problem; the basket could need to be replaced. Any idea if those parts are easy or not to find?

Offline Claude

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #13 on: May 29, 2020, 12:14:00 PM
*Originally Posted by Vespista1960 [+]
@ Claude, I would go with the CB400 F. One of the best bikes ever imho.

I agree but the clutch problem I wrote about in my precedent post (just above that one) make me wondering. Where I live, older bikes are next to impossible to find so if I am to get a CB400F, it will be that precise bike as there are no other ones.

But my first choice will be the KZ1100R for sure as I dreamed about this bike in 1984. I could get 2 or 3 bikes...

Offline Claude

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #14 on: May 29, 2020, 12:29:35 PM
*Originally Posted by TYKE [+]
Over the years I have owned 'quite a few' Classic bikes.. there are a number of decisions that need to be made before getting involved

1,   Are you hoping to make a Classic an investment for the future... IMHO any classic won't beat your pension

2    Do I plan to do all the restoration work myself, or employ the services of an 'expert'.... beware there are 'experts' ou there who are only good at charging huge sums

3,   Do I plan to ride the bike or exhibit it at Classic shows... High Days and holidays are really the best days for riding concourse bikes

4,    Which type/model of bike appeals to me... am I fulfilling a lifelong fantasy or re-living my youth

5,    JOIN A RELATED CLUB WHERE YOU WILL GAIN ADVICE AND HELP

6,    Certain makes/models of Classics have replacement parts that are extremely difficult to find, even 'unobtainium' and/or very, very expensive

7,   Don't buy the first  one that you see, take advice from experts on forums

I think that you should get yourself a project which will provide you with hours of enjoyment, however remember that older bikes can be costly, put a hole in your wallet and will remind you that a modern bike is much more reliable...

Good luck and let us know what you decide

Tyke, this is a really impressive collection!!! I always loved those 2 stroke triples! I already got a H1 and a H2 but they are impossible to find anymore. Never got one but the Suzuki GT750 always interested me (but is harder to find than Kawi’s…

My answers to your questions are:

1- No investment for the future. Just for the fun of owning, working on and riding.

2- I intend to do the work by myself. I want clean examples without too much complex work to do.

3- Riding only; no exhibit

4- Only those than rings a bell and that have a place in my memory

5- Will join a forum for sure

6- Any idea if those I listed are on the “unobtainium” list? Honestly, I don’t want to spend nights and nights looking for parts on Ebay or forums…

7- As I already wrote, the place where I live have been “wash out” of classic bikes. They did not really sell much in the 1990’s / 2000’s so they were exported in Japan, Europe or USA. So, if I find one I’m interested in, it’s almost the only option I will have…

Online Floydsz1

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Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 12:31:39 PM by Floydsz1

Offline TYKE

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #16 on: May 29, 2020, 07:13:51 PM
*Originally Posted by Claude [+]
Tyke, this is a really impressive collection!!! I always loved those 2 stroke triples! I already got a H1 and a H2 but they are impossible to find anymore. Never got one but the Suzuki GT750 always interested me (but is harder to find than Kawi’s…

My answers to your questions are:

1- No investment for the future. Just for the fun of owning, working on and riding.

2- I intend to do the work by myself. I want clean examples without too much complex work to do.

3- Riding only; no exhibit

4- Only those than rings a bell and that have a place in my memory

5- Will join a forum for sure

6- Any idea if those I listed are on the “unobtainium” list? Honestly, I don’t want to spend nights and nights looking for parts on Ebay or forums…

7- As I already wrote, the place where I live have been “wash out” of classic bikes. They did not really sell much in the 1990’s / 2000’s so they were exported in Japan, Europe or USA. So, if I find one I’m interested in, it’s almost the only option I will have…

Suzuki GT750 are comparatively  easy to get parts for, they are good to ride and easy on the eye, but they are heavy

Good luck with your decision 
Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 07:21:38 PM by TYKE
The world is full of good people, if you can't find one - be one

Make every second count, make every moment special.

Rog

Offline flatfour

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #17 on: May 29, 2020, 07:33:31 PM
Claude, I suggest that you join the Honda SOHC Forum before going any further, if you are considering a Honda.

I use the UK site, however there is also a U.S. version of the same, and I believe that the two cooperate with each other.

You will find lots of information there and guidance on just about every subject. it also helps that (at least on the U.K Forum) there are some professional engine builders and restorers who see the problems that we encounter occasionally every day. Decals, clocks etc. can all be supplied or refurbished to as new by Forum members at modest cost.

Most spares can be obtained from either David Silver or CMSNL (I see that someone has kindly posted links to these suppliers) however if not, the forum members are incredibly generous, often helping each other out with rare items etc.

If you do go the Honda route, I suspect that you will find maintenance minimal once the bike is "right", however I always make a habit of buying any hard - to - find spares that I come across, whether I need them or not. This makes the bikes "future proof" as far as possible and means that I can try parts from stock if a fault develops.

I cover around 2,500 miles a year on each of the old bikes and they are not treated gently. Once a year I change oil and filter and every second year clean the sump strainer, adjust valve clearances and tension the cam chain. Contact breaker gaps are set at the same time and ignition timing adjusted. The air filter and final drive chain are changed on condition. Finally, the drive chain is lubricated every few weeks and tensioned as needed (rarely).
changed on condition.

Offline Claude

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Re: Old motorcycles
Reply #18 on: May 29, 2020, 07:47:30 PM
Thanks to all of you for the information! I really appreciate!

 



waggish