Author Chain Life  (Read 1719 times)

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  • Offline RaYzerman   ca

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      #10

    Offline RaYzerman

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    Re: Chain Life
    Reply #10 on: January 28, 2022, 02:43:34 am
    January 28, 2022, 02:43:34 am
    The chain slack is supposed to be adjusted while on the side stand.... if you're doing it on the centerstand, it won't be correct.
    The VFR on the other hand, is checked while on the centerstand.
    Last Edit: January 28, 2022, 02:46:09 am by RaYzerman
    2016 V1000 LT,  '99 VFR 800, 2013 Fazer8 (project).

    Experience is a great teacher, she gives you the tests first and the lessons later.

  • Offline 2tallrider   ca

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      #11

    Offline 2tallrider

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    Re: Chain Life
    Reply #11 on: January 30, 2022, 12:45:30 am
    January 30, 2022, 12:45:30 am
    This kind of explains it. Swing-arm geometry. The swing-arm is generally articulated around a line that is positioned to the rear of the drive-chain primary sprocket axis. As you increase suspension loading, the rotation of the swing-arm will cause the effective chain length to change, causing it to tighten up or loosen depending on the geometry of the chassis. You need to get the chain tension adjusted to suit the kind of load you regularly carry on the bike

  • Offline Keener   ca

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      #12

    Offline Keener

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    Re: Chain Life
    Reply #12 on: January 30, 2022, 05:45:09 am
    January 30, 2022, 05:45:09 am
     :762:

  • Offline TowerMan   scotland

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      #13

    Offline TowerMan

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    Re: Chain Life
    Reply #13 on: January 30, 2022, 09:08:08 am
    January 30, 2022, 09:08:08 am
    *Originally Posted by 2tallrider [+]
    This kind of explains it. Swing-arm geometry. The swing-arm is generally articulated around a line that is positioned to the rear of the drive-chain primary sprocket axis. As you increase suspension loading, the rotation of the swing-arm will cause the effective chain length to change, causing it to tighten up or loosen depending on the geometry of the chassis. You need to get the chain tension adjusted to suit the kind of load you regularly carry on the bike

    That's also why they recommend you adjust your rear suspension preload for different passenger / luggage weights.

    This means that the sag of the bike is in the same normal operating range / movement, so no chain adjustment is necessary due to different carried weight combo's
    Richard    :001:

    On the www.versys.co.uk forum

    PS -

  • Offline leachy   au

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    • #14

    Offline leachy

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    Re: Chain Life
    Reply #14 on: January 30, 2022, 11:59:47 pm
    January 30, 2022, 11:59:47 pm
    I just assumed it was on the centre stand for chain checking. Im also am thinking its done its initial stretch and will now settle in.

     



    waggish